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Recent FDA Approval Allows Local Patients Access to New Prostate Cancer Treatment.
When Scharukh Jalisi, MD, a veteran head and neck surgeon at Boston Medical Center, took his son to a local emergency room for treatment of a broken arm, he was struck not only by the $6,000 price tag but by the inherent inefficiency of the system that provided his son’s care. He was convinced that there had to be a more efficient and cost-effective way to provide that care, so he started to research why a hospital visit for a simple fracture could cost so much money.
By now the obesity epidemic and the accompanying increases in the occurrence of Type 2 diabetes, cardiovascular disease and common cancers have become old news. So the question many healthcare providers are asking is, “how is the healthcare system responding to this crisis?”
A Different Kind of Car Buying Experience Offered by a Company with Close Ties to the Healthcare Community
New Obstetrical and Gynecological Subspecialty Services Now Offered in a Local Community Setting
Triage System Key to Multidisciplinary Approach that Brings Relief to South Coast Patients with Neck and Back Pain
Recent FDA approval allows local patients access to new prostate cancer treatment.
Frustrated with insurance-based care, increasing numbers of physicians are turning to direct primary care to provide patients across the socioeconomic spectrum simpler, more personalized treatment.
Childhood cancer survivors living with chronic conditions as adults may experience a kind of accelerated aging due to the late effects of cancer treatment. However, survivors with no chronic conditions enjoy a quality of life similar to that of individuals with no history of cancer, according to a recent study.
Circadian rhythm disorders, such as irregular sleep-wake rhythms, are hallmarks of Parkinson’s disease. The medical community has traditionally believed the disorders are a side effect of Parkinson’s, but a recently published study is challenging that view.
As the healthcare industry changes and more Americans become insured, the clinical roles of nurse practitioners (NPs) and physician assistants (PAs) have grown. While that growth is clearly a response to greater need, opinions about the shifting care paradigm are not universally shared.
By now the obesity epidemic and the accompanying increases in the occurrence of Type 2 diabetes, cardiovascular disease and common cancers have become old news. So the question many healthcare providers are asking is, “how is the healthcare system responding to this crisis?”
In the four years since Beth Israel Deaconess Medical Center (BIDMC) acquired Milton Hospital, the 113-year-old hospital has expanded its specialty care services, ensuring that local patients have access to top physicians and treatments without having to travel into Boston.
When Ibrahim Eid, MD, founded the Prima CARE Center for Vascular Diseases in 2002, he did so with two overriding philosophies. One was a passion for providing south coast residents with access to cutting-edge vascular medicine right in their own community. The other was the firm belief that educating and empowering patients leads to better compliance and superior outcomes.
Melanoma patients frequently lack the knowledge or confidence to perform regular, effective skin self-exams (SSEs), according to recent research.
Studies point to a frequent disconnect between the priorities of clinical investigators and patient and physician end users. Engaging patients and other stakeholders in research prioritization can enhance study relevance and may even shorten the time it takes to bring scientific discoveries from the laboratory to the bedside.
Oncologist Ahmed Chaudhary, MD, joins the roster of skilled providers at Signature Healthcare Radiation Oncology who offer radiation therapy for an array of cancers.
Vibra Healthcare is creating an integrated center of clinical excellence in central Massachusetts, featuring intensivists and hospitalists directing patients’ medical care and rehabilitation, and a variety of specialists managing the complexities of long-term acute illness.
Breast cancer is one of the most anxiety-inducing diagnoses a woman can receive. She worries about her family, her health, her work and what the diagnosis will mean in the coming months and years. From the first 48 hours after a patient’s referral to well past her treatment, the multidisciplinary team at the Center for Breast Care at St. Elizabeth’s Medical Center concentrates on a simple principle: easing that anxiety.